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The process of policy details

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T&T had a turbulent year of soccer at the secondary school level 2017. The time has come for crisis intervention by a neutralist One that is not afraid to say that there are systemic commotions on the soccer companionway. However, there is a new Paradigm for healing. It is deeply imbedded in Behavior Modification. Behavior […]

T&T had a turbulent year of soccer at the secondary school level 2017.

The time has come for crisis intervention by a neutralist

One that is not afraid to say that there are systemic commotions on the soccer companionway. However, there is a new Paradigm for healing. It is deeply imbedded in Behavior Modification.

Behavior modification refers to behavior-change procedures that were employed during the 1970s and early 1980s.

Based on methodological behaviorism, overt behavior was modified through the use of presumed consequences to reduce behavior habituation.

 There is no prescriptive research identifying the most effective ways to change behavior. Be that as it may.

 Behavior modification at all levels must be the doctrinaire of the day for Adolescent and adults Soccer enthusiasts.

This is what happened in Secondary High School Soccer 2017:

  1. Teacher and Principal going to court for behavior modification issues.
  2. Coaches not adhering to expected behavior modification.
  3. Students are allowed to participate illegally.
  4. Illegal transfers from school to school.
  5. Non-academic compliance.
  6. Non-attendance tolerations.
  7. Players were coerced into double dipping between the expectation of playing semi- pros and high school soccer.
  8. Adults who are supposed to be exemplary leaders have failed their charge.
  9. Team policies set expectations for player behavior not in the conversation.

 Now, when selecting and documenting issues of your policies,

Consider the importance of each of the elements relative to your situation.

For example:

  1. If you coach a team that travels often, you will need a detailed section on behavior on the road.
  2. If you coach a team of 18- and 19-year-olds, you might need more detail on policies outlining the consequences of infractions than you would need
  3. If you coached a developmental team of 15-year-olds. Regardless of how many topics your policies cover, the most essential thing is to clearly spell out how your players (or others) are expected to conduct themselves and the consequences of failing to meet those expectations.
  4. When an athlete or other person violates a rule, it is often because he or she is not fully aware of that rule,

 How the rule fits within the context of the policy, or the consequences of breaking the rule.

For example:

If a player pleads ignorance after taking a banned substance contained in a weight control supplement-unless specifically told by the coach, trainer, or health professional, a young player might not be aware that she/he must check supplements for banned substances or even those common supplements can contain banned substances.

Having organized, well-written and clearly explained policies are one way to prevent or reduce the chance that your player will break the rules.

It would be strange not to believe that you might not be able to prevent all infractions, but you will be better equipped to deal with the consequences of infractions if your policies are clearly written and explained.

Areas to Cover in Team Policies

When selecting your team policies, it’s reasonable for you to ask what these should and should not cover.

Again, the extent of your policies and rules will depend on your team philosophy:

  1. The age of your athletes,
  2. The level of competition,
  3. How many people the policy covers.

Keep in mind that team policies and rules specify the standards of acceptable and unacceptable behaviors and the responsibilities each member is expected to accept.

Policies and rules prescribe the expectations and outcomes from team members and others involved, including coaches, players, support staff, volunteers, parents, spectators, and the media.

So, it is essential to carefully plan and develop your team policies and rules

 You should develop team policies and rules that cover important aspects of behavior and organizational issues that might affect how your team functions and performs.

It is prudent to believe that You cannot legislate morality every aspect of your players’ behavior, nor would you want to be responsible for enforcing such restrictions!

However, consider the purpose of your team policies:

  1. To communicate to your players (and others involved) your team’s philosophy
  2. How this philosophy should be reflected in attitude and behavior.

Such consideration should lead you to identify the areas to cover in your team policies.

Bear in mind that all legislation is moral. The sooner one recognizes this fact, the better.

“You can’t legislate morality” this has become a common turn of phrase.

The truth, however, is that every law and regulation that is proposed, passed, and enforced has inherent in it some idea of the good that it seeks to promote or preserve.

Indeed, no governing authority can in any way be understood to be morally neutral.

 Those who think such a chimerical understanding is possible could hardly be more wrong.

 In fact, the opposite is true: You cannot not legislate morality.

With this concept, what is to follow in this context will be in the process of policy details.

Dr.Cliff Bertrand

Olympian, Former NYC Board of Education Public School Administrator

The views expressed are those of the writer and not those of Usportt.com

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